This Modern Hangzhou Oasis Shows How Relaxed City Living Can Be

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For Hangzhou folks, home is where the city is. Wanting to present a softer side of this megalopolis, China-based interior design firm GFD effortlessly married the easy-going comforts of home with contemporary accents within this show flat, taking cues from both nature and the city to achieve the look they were going for. The designers describe it as an “interpretation of a pure modern urban lifestyle via unique design languages.”

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To weave in class and comfort, the team introduced a lavish flow of luxurious materials of an earthy palette and clean lines. Marble flooring in a glorious but tranquil shade of brown makes a sweeping statement in the communal zones. It is well-complemented by dark-tinted glass enclosures and woody textures, which balance high style with an intimate atmosphere.

With that, lived-in luxury greets one at every turn, especially at the living area with a double volume ceiling. This generous scale in height made it possible for the designers to work in a multi-purpose space allocated at the mezzanine level. “While it is a show flat, we’ve designed the space for a family of three in mind—possibly a young couple with a little boy, and who likes to entertain and has multiple hobbies,” explain the designers.

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To conceptualise a layout perfect for keen entertainers, the designers integrated the living and dining space which is now flanked by a semi-open kitchen and a study. The floor plan also outlines a master bedroom, a child’s bedroom and a guestroom, and it is primed to offer an idyllic slice of city living.

This post was adapted from an article originally published in the November 2020 issue of SquareRooms.